Apple staff say forcing them to work in person will lead to a ‘whiter, male-dominated’ workforce

Apple staff say forcing them to work in person will lead to a ‘whiter, male-dominated’ workforce

Apple staff say forcing them to work in person will lead to a 'whiter, male-dominated' workforce

A group of Apple employees have accused the big tech giant of racism for pushing company employees to return to the office, saying returning to an in-person model would make the company “younger, more white, [and] more dominated by men.

The employees, organized as part of the newly formed group Apple Together, petitioned the company in an open letter on Friday after CEO Tim Cook told employees they would have to work from the office one day a week at from April 11, two days a week. after three weeks, and three days a week after May 23.

They wrote that the decision to bring the employees back to the office was not driven by a “need to commune in person,” as Cook wrote in his letter to staff, but rather by the company’s “fear for the future of work, fear of worker autonomy [and] fear of losing control.

Although Apple “probably still finds people willing to work here,” the group wrote, returning to work at the office “will change the composition of [the company’s workforce].’

“This will lead to privileges in deciding who can work for Apple, not who would be best suited,” the group wrote.

‘Privileges like “being born in the right place so you don’t have to move”, or “being young enough to start a new life in a new city/country” or “having a stay-at-home spouse who moves with you.”‘

“And privileges like being born in a gender that society doesn’t expect the majority of care about, so it’s easy to disappear around an office all day, not doing your fair share of unpaid work in society. Or be rich enough to pay others to take care of you.

Rather than “throwing money at the problem and simply increasing referral bonuses to replace those of our colleagues who let down the management team’s inflexibility”, the group advocates pursuing a working model at distance so that “everyone who wants to work at Apple can do it.

There has been a marked increase in diversity at Apple amid the pandemic, although it’s unclear if this has been driven by the company’s shift to remote working.

In 2014, the company’s workforce was 70% male and 30% female, but those percentages have changed — according to Apple’s 2022 Inclusion and Diversity Report, 65 .2% of the workforce are now men and 34.8% are women.

Apple management saw an 87% increase in female employees worldwide, the company boasted, and its total female workforce grew by 89%.

The company hired more minorities than ever before in 2021 – that is, 25% of Apple’s leadership positions and 41% of its retail positions were filled by black and Hispanic workers.

Pictured is Apple's headquarters in Cupertino, California.  CEO Tim Cook announced that employees would return to the office one day a week from April 11, then gradually increase to three days a week from May 23.

Pictured is Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California. CEO Tim Cook announced that employees would return to the office one day a week from April 11, then gradually increase to three days a week from May 23.

Although Apple

Although Apple “probably still finds people willing to work here,” the group wrote, returning to work at the office “will change the composition of [the company’s workforce].’ People are pictured walking past an Apple store in New York

However, Apple Together’s qualms went beyond diversity – the group outlined five additional reasons for their displeasure with the company’s return to in-person work.

They lamented that the company would force employees to make unnecessary journeys to work and denounced a disconnect between the company’s marketing to customers using its products to work remotely from around the world and its treatment of Staff.

“How can we understand what remote working issues need to be addressed in our products if we don’t experience it?” reads the letter.

They also mocked Cook’s description of “the serendipity that comes from colliding with colleagues”, arguing that this fanciful vision was impossible between the company’s 37 US offices even before the company moved away. during the pandemic.

“We are not all in the same place. We don’t just have one office, we have several. And often our functional organizations have their own office buildings, in which employees of other organizations cannot work,” they wrote. “This siled structure is part of our culture.”

In September, with tensions over the company’s return to in-person work still simmering before Apple’s plans to bring workers back were thwarted by the outbreak of the Delta variant of COVID-19, the engineer Apple Cher Scarlett spoke to Vox about this expectation of incooperation from the person.

“There’s this idea of ​​people skateboarding around tech campuses meeting and coming up with awesome new inventions,” said Scarlett, who joined the company during the pandemic and has become a leader in organizing his colleagues to push for more remote work. “That’s just not true.”

Scarlett, one of the two founding members of Apple Together when it was founded in August as “Apple Too”, left the company in November and filed a complaint with the labor board.

She and Janneke Parrish, who was also fired and also filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, encouraged staff members to tell stories of racism, sexism or discrimination in their workplace.

A spokesperson for Apple Together told CNN Business, an employee who works on hardware engineering in the Bay Area and asked to remain anonymous, told the outlet that there were about 200 workers within the group – in total, Apple has more than 100,000 employees in the United States.

Apple CEO Tim Cook (pictured) said in an email to staff members that employees should start returning to the office - but Apple Together, a newly formed group of employees, said it would lead to privileges to decide who can work for Apple'

Apple CEO Tim Cook (pictured) said in an email to staff members that employees should start returning to the office – but Apple Together, a newly formed group of employees, said it would lead to privileges to decide who can work for Apple’

“There’s such a disconnect between executive leadership and individuals,” the employee said, “The higher you go up the chain, the more that empathy erodes.”

Apple Together said in its letter that it’s much easier to collaborate with colleagues from their home offices, rather than Apple’s new offices with open floor plans.

They also decried the company’s recent decision to keep employees from different departments and company locations in separate Slack workplaces, which makes it “impossible to create shared community spaces where serendipity could have occurred.” “.

“We are not asking that everyone be forced to work from home,” the letter read. ‘we ask to decide for ourselves, with our teams and our direct manager, what type of work organization best suits each of us, whether in an office, working from home or in a hybrid approach.

Apple’s correspondence with employees comes after other Big Tech giants, like Twitter and Facebook, told its employees they could work from home indefinitely.

#Apple #staff #forcing #work #person #lead #whiter #maledominated #workforce

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.